Cult Theatre Postcards: Series One, Card Number 10 – Boulevard Theatre

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This historic Cult Theatre Grindhouse Postcard features an extremely rare photo of the Boulevard Theatre. The theater was located 3302 Greenmount Avenue in Baltimore, Maryland.

When the photo was taken, the Boulevard Theatre was screening a double feature of the Chuck Norris karate thriller Code of Silence and Taimak in the Motown kung fu drama The Last Dragon.

The Boulevard theater at 3302 Greenmount Avenue, in the former village of Waverly, opened in October 1921. In its day, The Boulevard was where upper class audiences went to the movies and was located very close to the stylish Guilford and Peabody Heights/Charles Village neighborhoods. The theater was often considered the “higher style movie house” compared to the Waverly Theatre one block south on Greenmount Avenue. The theater was designed by Ewald G. Blank for Alfred Buck’s American Theater Company, and built by E. Eyring & Sons. It seated 1,500 viewers and was an F.H. Durkee property. The original movie house screen had a deeply curved screen. Lavish interior decorations included mulberry silk tapestry panels, shades of pearl gray, azure blue, gold and violet. It had an interior dome and paintings by a new York artist Leo Sielke, in the ladies’ lounge. Besides having an organ and a piano, there was also a house orchestra.The theater was sold at auction in 1922 for $145,000, being acquired by the Boulevard Company. In due course it closed, but was purchased by the Durkee organization for over $100,000 in 1926, reopening in 1927. The theatre was split down the middle and twinned in the late-1960’s. It had closed for good by the 1980s.

The building has been gutted and various shops are now located inside, however the front entrance has not been changed and the large marquee still stands. For a number of years the building was a “$10 and Under” store. The front of the theatre was ornate with “dancing ladies” in stone that have started to crumble over the years but are still visible from the street.

All Cult Theatre Postcards feature vintage and grindhouse movie theaters within the United States. The series includes cinemas in major urban centers such as Downtown Los Angeles, New York’s Times Square – then known as “The Deuce,” Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Philadelphia, Baltimore and many, many more famous cities. The movie theatres are screening cult classics, B-movies, martial arts films, horror films and more.

The time was the 1980’s and movie theaters were attempting to reinvent themselves, with smaller budgets and new audiences. Many independently owned theaters resorted to low-cost B-movies and Asian movie imports, especially kung fu films.

Other movie theaters in the Cult Theatres Postcard collection include The Loew’s Theater, Rialto Theater, Anco Theater, Malco Theater, Paramount Theater, Fox Nickelodeon Theater, Luna Theater, Woods Theater, Cameo Theater, Cinema 35 Theater, Washington Theater, Capri Theater, Publix Theater, The Pussycat Theater, Center Theater, McVickers Theater, The Castle Theater, El Morro Theater, Cine 42 Theater, Stadium Theater, Empire Theater, Majestic Theater, Brauntex Theater, RKO Jefferson Theater, Times Square Theater, Liberty Theater, Roxy Theater, Embassy Theater, Strand Theater, Uptown Theater, State-Lake Theater, Los Angeles Theater, Tower Theater, Victoria Theater, Adams Theater, Chicago Theater, Boulevard Theater, New Isis Theater, Howard Theater, Academy Theater, Sam Eric Theater, Sameric Theater and more.

This vintage-style movie theater postcard item has been filed under theaters, theatres, grindhouse, movie theaters, vintage, grind house, cinemas, entertainment, collectibles, b movies, grindhouse theaters, cult cinemas, cult classics, martial arts films, movies, horror films, the deuce, hollywood, 42nd street.

These extremely rare movie theater images are officially licensed and scanned directly from the negatives or the best quality photo image available.

See full set of Cult Theatre photos at culttheatres.com.